Results tagged ‘ Brennan Boesch ’

Early notes: Boesch day-to-day with oblique tightness

It’s all relative, but it’s a chilly morning by Florida standards in Lakeland, where Bruce Rondon is scheduled to throw to hitters this afternoon. One hitter who will not be taking part today is Brennan Boesch, who tweaked his right oblique while taking swings on Saturday.

It’s a precautionary move, Boesch said. Better to miss a few days now and be ready when games begin next weekend than to have this linger. Remember, Boesch was bothered by minor injuries last spring training, including lower back soreness and a bad ankle.

“It’s February. I don’t want to take any chances right now,” Boesch said. “Get it over with so I can get plenty of at-bats in Spring Training. …

“I’m optimistic I’ll be out there in the next day or two. The most important thing is not rushing it so I get all the at-bats I need in spring to compete and to prepare for the season.”

Other notes from Sunday morning:

  • Look for the Tigers to get Rule 5 pick Jeff Kobernus some time in left field this spring as they try to determine just how useful the speedy right-handed hitter can be as a utility player. Kobernus was almost exclusively a second baseman in the Nationals system the last four years, but said he did outfield work this winter to prepare. With his speed and his success against left-handed pitching in the minors (.326 last year at Double-A Harrisburg, .306 at Harrisburg in 2011), he definitely has manager Jim Leyland’s attention. “I think he’s a very interesting guy,” Leyland said, “and he will definitely get every possible look to see if he’s a fit or not.”
  • Leyland says they have 15 legitimate candidates for the bullpen, including sure things like Joaquin Benoit, Phil Coke and Octavio Dotel. It’s a good number to have, and potentially could give them some options at the end of camp as well as into the season, but the closer question is going to have an impact throughout the bullpen unless they have one guy who can take hold of the job.

Seven eligible Tigers file for arbitration

It’s a formality, but still worth noting that the seven Tigers eligible for arbitration all filed on Tuesday. The list includes three members of rotation (Doug Fister, Max Scherzer, Rick Porcello), two members of the starting lineup (Alex Avila, Austin Jackson), lefty Phil Coke and outfielder Brennan Boesch.

Basically, what it means is that none of them have apparently reached deals yet to avoid arbitration. There’s still plenty of time for that, but the next big milepost in the process will come on Friday, when they’ll exchange arbitration figures with the team. That’s usually the step that gets both sides moving towards a deal, because it provides a range to use to find a middle ground. From there, the two sides have until at least Feb. 4 to negotiate before hearings begin taking place.

The Tigers have not had to go to an arbitration ruling since Dave Dombrowski took over as GM in 2002. They’ve come close a couple times, but usually they settle soon after the two sides exchange numbers.

Tigers non-tender Daniel Schlereth (updated)

Turns out the Tigers did have a non-tender decision to make Friday, but it wasn’t an arbitration-eligible player. Instead, it was Daniel Schlereth, who’s a year away from arbitration but also a year separated from his healthy pitching form.

The left-handed reliever, who was part of the Tigers’ return in the Edwin Jackson trade at the winter meetings three years ago, missed most of this past season with shoulder tendinitis. He spent most of the summer trying to rehab his way back to pitching health and avoid surgery, and he got back in time for a rehab assignment at Triple-A Toledo in August. He had some decent results, but his velocity was down, and he wasn’t activated from the DL when rosters expanded in September.

Team president/GM Dave Dombrowski said this afternoon that the health wasn’t an issue in the decision.

“I think he was fine at the end of the year,” Dombrowski said.

Indeed, Schlereth confirmed he’s in better shape now, and ready to start his offseason throwing program in preparation for Spring Training. Now he has to find a camp.

“Everything is good now,” Schlereth said in a phone interview Friday afternoon. “I actually have to start throwing this week or next week. If there was still something wrong by this time, I’d be having surgery, and I don’t plan to.”

So if it wasn’t a question of health, what was it?

“It’s just a situation where today you have to make final decisions,” Dombrowski said. “We just felt at this time the roster space was more appealing to us than having that spot tied up with his tender.”

The move caught Schlereth by surprise. He wasn’t angry, but he was definitely caught off-guard.

“I just never thought this would happen. This blindsided me,” he said.

At the same time, he had no hard feelings for the Tigers.

“I love the team,” he said. “It’s a great organization. Its’ going to hurt a little bit, but that’s life. They want to move on and I really can’t do that. I just have to go out and prove myself somewhere else.”

In the end, Schlereth does think the injury had something to do with it, at least the way it unfolded. He admits to trying to pitch through shoulder soreness in April, not saying anything about it until the Tigers tried to option him to Triple-A Toledo.

“At the end of the day, it’s my career, my doing. They did all they could do,” Schlereth said. “They recognized I was hurt in the big leagues and [the injury] didn’t happen in the minor leagues. And I’m actually thankful they did that, because being on the DL in the minor leagues would be brutal. I’m really thankful they did that. But there’s really nothing that could’ve changed. It was probably bound to happen.”

Dombrowski said the move doesn’t lead the Tigers into a search for another lefty reliever. Duane Below, Darin Downs, Matt Hoffman and Andy Oliver are currently on the roster with a chance to take the second lefty job in the bullpen (if Detroit carries a second lefty reliever). Casey Crosby also could end up being a factor, though he’s expected to work as a starter.

The Tigers tendered contracts to all their other players without long-term contracts. That includes outfielder Brennan Boesch, whom Dombrowski said last month they would tender a contract.

The Schlereth move brings the Tigers’ 40-man roster to 38 players and two open spots. They already had an open spot from releasing Ryan Raburn last week. It doesn’t necessarily mean they have multiple moves coming at next week’s Winter Meetings. It means Raburn and Schlereth weren’t going to be part of this team no matter what moves are coming this winter.

Dombrowski’s end-of-season remarks (with notes)

There are few things faster in baseball these days than a Bruce Rondon fastball. It has been clocked as high as 102 mph, including during the Futures Game in July at Kansas City’s Kauffman Stadium.

The only thing faster in the Tigers organization than Rondon’s fastball might be the track he’s on.

Dave Dombrowski’s end-of-season remarks are an annual tradition now, painting the roadmap for the Tigers offseason, both for what they might look to do and what their plans are with pending players. It also seems there’s usually a prospect or two that gets some lift out of it.

Three years ago, it was Scott Sizemore. Last year, Drew Smyly got a mention. Today might well go down as the day Dombrowski set the path for Rondon.

Everybody figured him to be a closer of the future with these guys. Tuesday was the day we found just how near that future might be.

“I would not discount Bruce Rondon in the competition for our closer role for next year,” Dombrowski said. “I’m not saying he’s going to be our closer, but I do not discount him in that role.

“He is a guy that throws — and people don’t sometimes believe this, but it is true — he averages 100 miles an hour and topped off at 103, and throws his breaking stuff for consistent strikes.”

Dombrowski confirmed what others had speculated, that Rondon was a serious consideration for a call-up leading into September this year, which would’ve made him eligible for the postseason roster. Had they known that Valverde was going to struggle the way they did, they would’ve done it, which would’ve put a whole different look on Detroit’s closer by committee.

“This guy is a special potential closer with the makeup of a closer,” Dombrowski continued, “and normally you’re not going to thrust that in a young guy’s hands and say automatically, ‘It’s your job.’ But it would not surprise me if he earned that job. With the number of good arms that are out there, there are not many arms like this, and he cherishes that type of role.”

Dombrowski wasn’t the only one touting Rondon. When Leyland was asked about the difference between going with a closer by committee in a postseason and doing that for a full season, he hesitated.

“I’ve handled those situations before, but who’s to say we won’t have a closer,” Leyland countered. “I think we will have a closer. I think it might be a surprise closer, but I think we might have one. And I’m not talking about Phil Coke, by the way. Not that I don’t like Phil Coke.”

Someone then mentioned Rondon.

“Rondon’s a good name. Here’s a kid, who knows? Believe me, I’m not putting my blessing on Rondon as a closer for next year, but I’m just mentioning that name as a possibility. When you’ve got an arm like that, that’s a possibility. Now, could he handle it mentally, could he handle it in a three-tier stadium with the bright lights? I don’t have a clue.”

It’s an interesting contrast. The last Tigers reliever who threw as hard as Bruce Rondon does was Joel Zumaya, who crashed the roster to become a force in a setup relief role in 2006. At no point did Zumaya ever earn the closer’s job, partly because of injuries but not entirely.

The last rookie to have any sort of closing job in Detroit was Franklyn German, who shared the job in 2003. However, a closer’s role on a 43-119 team isn’t exactly like a regular job. German shared the team lead in saves — with five.

If you count Fernando Rodney’s time down the stretch in 2005, the Tigers have had experienced closers in the role every year since 2006.

“You see [Aroldis] Chapman close and there’s been other young guys close for clubs,” Dombrowski said. “I know it hasn’t been our normal situation. People know how good an arm Zumaya had, this guy has every bit and it comes out easier with less effort in his delivery.”

Dombrowski is aware of their track record. He’s also well-aware he has a team that’s expected to win next year, a team that opened as a World Series favorite this week.

“I think you also have to be open-minded and flexible,” Dombrowski said. “It’s just like a couple years ago when in 2006, Verlander and Zumaya jumped up pretty good for us at that point. This guy [Rondon] is a talented guy. He’s a rare talent. You would not believe the number of clubs that called me about Bruce Rondon to trade him. If I had a choice of any young closer in baseball to give an opportunity to in any organization, it would be him. Now would be ready? I don’t know that. But he is that good.”

Here’s a roundup of the other remarks he had:

  • Dombrowski was on the fence on whether Dirks has a full-time starting role for next year: “Dirks is a good player. Is he an every-day player at this point? I don’t know. He might be. I know he’s a real good player. Can he combine with somebody? So I think we’ll just kind of look at that.”
  • Dombrowski poo-poohed the idea that they could non-tender Brennan Boesch. “We’ll tender him a contract,” Dombrowski said. “He’s not where we would like him to be at this point, because if we did he’d have been on our roster for the postseason, so that’s a pretty obvious summation. But I think it’s the case that he still has ability, he can still hit the ball out of the ballpark. We still see some untapped potential, and he has struggled some.”
  • When asked what went wrong in the World Series, Dombrowski cited the offense, and pointed to an article that said they went 1-for-17 when putting pitches in play that were over the middle of the plate (not sure which article, otherwise I’d provide a link). “They pitched well,” Dombrowski said, “but we also didn’t hit the pitches we could handle. Why didn’t they do that? Was the timing a little bit off? Maybe. Did they keep off timing with the layover, did they keep them off-balance with the stuff that they threw, changing speeds? I’m sure that, too. Did they start pressing a little bit, try to do too much? Maybe a combination of all that. But it’s almost hard to believe when you say they went 1-for-17 on balls down the middle of the plate.”
  • Quintin Berry will go into camp with a chance to compete for a spot on the roster. Coincidentally, Leyland said that with Victor Martinez back, they’ll have a use for a pinch-runner on their bench.
  • The Tigers will designate Don Kelly for assignment later on this week, Dombrowski said, to open a spot on the 40-man roster. From there, clubs will have a chance to claim him, just as they did when the Tigers designated him in August. If he isn’t claimed, however, the Tigers would like to bring him back on a minor-league contract to compete for a roster spot. “He knows how well thought of he is here,” Dombrowski said. “But I also know that other people are in a position where somebody may offer him a better opportunity. That’s what guys look for when they’re free agents.”
  • No comment on the status of Ryan Raburn, because Dombrowski hasn’t had a chance to talk with him yet. They still have him under team control for a year, so technically they don’t have to do anything if they want to keep him. If they want to use his roster spot for someone else, well, that’s another matter, and one they would probably want to talk with him about.
  • Dombrowski did not want to get into the possibility of contract talks with Justin Verlander and Max Scherzer, both two years away from free agency. That’s a matter he still has to discuss with ownership. However, he said they’d like to have both for a long time.
  • Avisail Garcia, Dombrowski said, is a “tough call” on whether he makes the roster next year. “He has star potential,” Dombrowski said. “He’s a five-tool player. I’m not sure that he’s ready as a corner outfielder to give us the contributions that we need on an overall basis at this time, but I’m not sure that he’s not. He is going to play everyday in winter ball for Magglio’s team in Venezuela. I think he’s a guy that we’ll keep a real close eye on in how he develops over the wintertime.”
  • If the Tigers can’t re-sign Sanchez, Dombrowski didn’t sound particularly strong about getting another starter to fill his spot, saying it would have to be a substantial improvement over what they have.
  • Smyly would not be viewed as a full-time reliever.
  • Dombrowski is not concerned about Scherzer going into the offseason. “What happened,” Dombrowski said, “was [his shoulder] got tired like a lot of your muscles get tired, and it’s just more a mater of it needing some rest and then building it back up. So he got some rest and built it back up, but at that time period you don’t have a chance to go out there every five days and build it up. So the feeling is with Scherzer that he’ll be absolutely fine.”
  • A second lefty reliever isn’t a high priority for the Tigers to acquire this winter. Dombrowski believes they can fill the spot in-house, though he didn’t rule out adding an arm.

Leyland is going to rotate his corner outfielders

The Tigers came into Tuesday’s game against the Yankees weighting their lineup towards right-handed hitters against Phil Hughes, a right-hander who has been far tougher on lefties than righties this year. They won in part with two RBI singles from Andy Dirks and two tough at-bats from Brennan Boesch, both left-handed hitters.

On Wednesday, they’ll face an actual left-handed pitcher, CC Sabathia, who has been tough on left-handed hitters for the better part of a decade. And so, manager Jim Leyland will give Jeff Baker, the right-handed utilityman they acquired over the weekend, his first playing time with a start in left field. Gerald Laird will start behind the plate (hopefully finishing the game this time), and Ramon Santiago will start in place of Jhonny Peralta, who’s a right-handed hitter but who’s 2-for-20 off Sabathia.

This is the flexibility Leyland wanted from his roster down the stretch, particularly in the outfield. He admits he felt starting pitcher was a bigger priority than extra right-handed bat, but he still wanted the latter to fill out the roster. Now that he has what he needed, he says he’s going to try to get everyone involved, particularly in the outfield. But it won’t be easy.

“We have a chance right now to have everybody involved,” Leyland said. “Everybody has a chance to be a hero. But everybody’s got to buy in.”

With that in mind, Leyland said he met with all of his outfielders earlier this week and tried to let them know his plans.

“I told them, ‘I can play four of six every day, but I can’t play you all every day,'” he said. “I explained it to them so everybody knows their situation and everybody knows they might not be in the lineup every day with the exception of [Austin] Jackson. Everybody knows pretty much what they’re going to be doing and you just ask them to be on board and be patient with it, because I’m happy with all the outfielders. But I can only play three in the outfield and one DH. That’s four; we got six. That’s fun but it also keeps people fresh.”

That holds especially true against most right-handed starters, since they have three left-handed hitters in Boesch, Dirks and Quintin Berry. Leyland said Tuesday night that he’ll start Berry on Thursday against Hiroki Kuroda. It’ll be Berry’s first start in five days.

“When you have a dilemma, and it’s a good dilemma, you meet it head-on,” Leyland said.

Leyland planning to start Delmon in left on some days

Delmon Young returned to left field this past weekend out of necessity, thanks to Interleague play and National League rules. Turns out he might still get some starts there once the Tigers return home and get their designated hitter slot back next weekend against the Rockies.

Young went 2-for-13 with a solo homer, a double and four strikeouts over the three-game series in Cincinnati, where he started all three games in left field. He also made a costly misplay in left field Saturday on a ball he lost in the sunlight. His batting average for the season dropped from .261 to .254. However, he’s still batting better as a left fielder (.277 average, .759 OPS) than as a DH (.244, .640).

Young began the season playing in left field and struggled out of the gate in April. He missed a week on MLB’s restricted list in the wake of his arrest in New York City at the end of April on aggravated harrassment and hate crime charges, then returned in early May to find himself virtually a full-time DH.

Manager Jim Leyland isn’t promising Young a lot of play in the outfield, but would like to use him there a couple days a week, he said after Sunday night’s win.

“I talked to him a little bit about this — DH four or five times a week, but play the outfield a couple [times], but to break it up for him I think would help,” Leyland said. “I’ve talked about all these things. We’ve been making plans for it, but it seems like we have somebody different every day that can’t go, so we haven’t been able to do exactly what we wanted.”

Most of the starts in left will go to Andy Dirks once he returns from the 15-day disabled list, potentially later this week. Quintin Berry could stick with the team in a reserve role, though Young getting a start or two in left might work against the speedy Berry.

Leyland also didn’t commit full-time to Dirks returning to the second spot in the lineup. He said he could continue play Brennan Boesch there if he remains on a hot streak.

Boesch: “Getting to Detroit as fast as I can”

Brennan Boesch came to Spring Training ready to pick up the work on his swing that he began back home in California.

When he got that down a couple weeks ago, he started working on his approach.

After three homers in four days, including a rather mammoth shot to right-center Thursday night off Nationals right-hander Mitch Atkins, Boesch sounded like somebody ready to go north.

“I like to think that I build as Spring Training goes to a point where you feel like you have the swing where you want to be,” he said after the game. “And from then on, you’re playing and competing, and the swing’s no longer something you’re concerned about. It’s about getting good pitches and having a good approach in game situations. That’s when it starts to get fun, when you can trust your swing and start competing out there.”

Safe to say, he’s there.

“Yeah, I think most of us are at this point,” Boesch said. “Maybe some more than others, but for me, it’s just about getting to Detroit as quick as I can.”

Boesch said he hit a curveball — not a bad pitch by his view, but one that stayed up long enough for him to drive it.

He’s obviously going to keep getting at-bats down the stretch, but it’s about putting the finishing touches and stay fresh.

“If you’re not ready, there’s probably something physically wrong with you or you’ve been held back with an injury or tightness,” he said. “These last at-bats are really just fine-tuning, getting your legs under you, playing seven, eight, nine innings. But hittingwise, I think most guys are probably pretty prepared to start the season at this point.”

Why a Johnny Damon reunion makes sense

Around this time two years ago, the Tigers were about midway through the six-week saga of signing Johnny Damon to be their left fielder and designated hitter. He had a good, not great season in Detroit, good for a .756 OPS and a .355 on-base percentage, then was told by the Tigers near season’s end they weren’t interested in re-signing him. Detroit was already plotting a pursuit of free-agent Victor Martinez.

So with Martinez likely out for the season, why would the Tigers have interest in going back to Damon?

Well, they have a few pretty good reasons. But the big picture is that this is a much different team, and a much better offense, than the one that split with Damon last offseason. Delmon Young is the veteran, run producing corner outfielder the Tigers lacked in 2010. Brennan Boesch isn’t a rookie anymore, and Alex Avila is an RBI guy.

The Tigers are searching for a bat to fill the opening left by Martinez, but if they can help it, they’d rather do it with an outfielder. They’d rather keep Miguel Cabrera at first base than have to move him in and out of the DH slot, and an outfielder would allow them some flexibility with Delmon Young in the DH role if they want. Granted, Damon has had just 46 starts in the outfield over the last two seasons, but he at least provides the capability.

Juan Pierre, another free agent linked to the Tigers, kind of falls in the same category, though he has been an everyday outfielder the last couple years in Chicago. Both have declining skills showing, especially in the field, but both can be productive near the top of the order.

Neither would likely be as expensive as a middle-of-the-order hitter, which is a factor. Though the Tigers did have an insurance policy on Victor Martinez, it isn’t believed to be for nearly as much as many have speculated (including myself).

Damon or Pierre would allow them to move either Young or  Boesch down while (in theory) improving the percentages of Cabrera coming up with runners on base. They also add a left-handed bat in the top third of the order, something both manager Jim Leyland and team president/general manager Dave Dombrowski have referenced in recent days. Leyland, of course, has also referenced the appeal of adding a top-third order hitter and a better baserunner.

The idea, of course, hinges on somebody else batting behind Cabrera.  Young thrived last year batting in front of Cabrera in part because he saw a lot of strikes; nobody’s going to pitch around the guy batting in front of Cabrera. Boesch struggled mightily batting behind Cabrera down the stretch in 2010, but he’s a more mature hitter now. Leyland never wanted to bat Jhonny Peralta above sixth last year, and he didn’t want to put a whole lot of RBI pressure on Alex Avila either.

Interest in Damon appears to be in the early stages at this point. The Tigers haven’t had any direct contact with Damon, according to a source. But then, with the Yoenis Cespedes pursuit on hold pending his residency clearance in the Dominican Republic, the Tigers aren’t likely to add an outfielder until the Cespedes courtship gets resolved, or at least becomes clearer.

Dombrowski: Ordonez, Guillen likely gone, iffy on Santiago

Lot of updates from president/GM Dave Dombrowski today in his talk with reporters. More in-depth stuff coming, but here’s the rundown …

  • Dombrowski said there won’t be a “real strong push” to bring a lot of their free agents back. Most likely, he said, Magglio Ordonez and Carlos Guillen are done as Tigers. “I would say in their case it’s highly unlikely they’re going to be back. In both cases,” said Dombrowski, who said he let both of them know that in the last month of the season.
  • Brad Penny also won’t be back. “With the young pitching we have coming, I would doubt we would re-sign him,” Dombrowski said.
  • Dombrowski wasn’t completely clear on the fifth starter situation. Ideally, he said, they’ll have a veteran as “protection” in case Jacob Turner or one of their other young guys aren’t ready. At another point, though, he said that if they sign a veteran for the job, Turner would start the season at Triple-A Toledo.
  • Here’s the main quote on the rotation: “The most likely scenario would be that those young guys come to camp with the four guys that are set and  compete for the fifth spot, and we have protection of a veteran type pitcher that can fill that if they’re not ready. But I also would say that, hey, if there’s some great starting pitcher that we really liked and was available for us, and we thought it was the type of move that made the most sense to get us better, would we be open to it? Yes. We like them all. We like every one of those pitchers. But can I tell you 100 percent that they’re ready? No. Now, can they be ready? Yes.”
  • Ramon Santiago is basically in a bad situation, at least as far as returning to Detroit goes. There’s mutual interest,  but Santiago wants a more regular role, and the Tigers don’t see him that way. “I think our feeling has been that we just don’t see him as the guy going out there and playing – we may be wrong – 150 games a year,” Dombrowski said. “We just don’t happen to see him as that guy, and we may be wrong. He’s done a very fine job for us and we like him a lot, but that’s not the role we see him in. If we thought he was our everyday second baseman, we’d go out and we’d make that move.”
  • This quote from Dombrowski on the market for free agents at second and third base is pretty telling: “I don’t think they’re real strong. And that’s why, too, not only free agents, you’d also have to talk about the possibility of trades, too.”
  • His evaluation on how slow this market will move compared with the way they took care of business quickly last year was also telling: “I don’t think we’re going to be rushing out like we did last year. We’re in a different situation than we were last year, where we identified a couple guys right off the bat in [Victor] Martinez and [Joaquin] Benoit. We’re still prepared; I don’t mean to say that we couldn’t make a move if the right move came about. But I wouldn’t think we would make a real quick move. I think we’ll take more time to go through it and let it work itself out.”
  • The Tigers are open to re-signing Joel Zumaya, but it would have to be a minor-league contract with a Spring Training invite. At this point, it sounds like the Tigers expect Zumaya to wait and see if another team offers him a Major League deal. “He’d like to come back, and we would like to have him back,” Dombrowski said.
  • While Dombrowski didn’t anoint Delmon Young as the starting left fielder, he said he looks at his outfield being Young alongside Austin Jackson and Brennan Boesch. But he left open the possibility they could try to upgrade in left, and he acknowledged they have time before they have to decide whether to tender a contract to the arbitration-eligible Young.
  • Tigers will look at both free agents and trades to upgrade at second. They will look at possibilities at third as well. That said, Dombrowski left open the possibility they upgrade at one spot and platoon at the other. They could also go with grinders there. “You can never have enough good players,” Dombrowski said, “but you don’t want all star players. You want some of those gritty role-type players. Jim likes those on his club and is very successful at fitting them into his club.”
  • Dombrowski confirmed that the Tigers will look for a backup hitting catcher, preferably a right-handed hitter, to back up Alex Avila. The challenge, Dombrowski acknowledged, is convincing a good catcher to sign with a team where he isn’t likely to play very often. Even with a drop in playing time, Dombrowski said Avila could catch 120-125 games next year. He is an All-Star, after all.
  • The Tigers are open to possibly beefing up their bullpen with one more veteran, Dombrowski said, but he probably wouldn’t be a seventh- or eighth-inning setup guy. They like the core they have with Jose Valverde, Joaquin Benoit, Phil Coke, Al Alburquerque and Daniel Schlereth.
  • No chance of Phil Coke returning to the rotation.
  • Dombrowski basically threw down the challenge to Ryan Perry. ” He’s at the point where he needs to step it up for us,” Dombrowski said.
  • The door is open for the Tigers to add a leadoff hitter, but that isn’t a sure thing. “We need to get better offensive production out of Austin [Jackson],” Dombrowski said. “We think he’s capable of doing that. Will he be our leadoff hitter next season? We really can’t answer that question.”
  •  Chances of the Tigers shifting Jhonny Peralta to third base and pursuing Jose Reyes or Jimmy Rollins? Not likely. Peralta is sounding very likely to stick at short. “I would think so,” Dombrowski said. “Would I say 100 percent? No. Would I say most likely? Yes.”
  • Another factor seemingly working against a Reyes pursuit: The Tigers have their quota of $20 million players for the foreseeable future. “I would think so,” Dombrowski said.
  • The entire coaching staff will be back for next season, Dombrowski announced, unless somebody gets hired for a managerial job elsewhere. Dombrowski said he has not received any calls so far asking permission to talk with McClendon for such a job, but he would have no problem granting permission.

Tigers place Boesch on 15-day disabled list

The Tigers took care of the roster part of Brennan Boesch’s season-ending thumb surgery by placing the outfielder on the 15-day disabled list Friday.

The move is a formality, but an important one. It makes no difference for the regular-season roster, since rosters are expanded for September and they don’t need the extra room. For the postseason roster, however, it might allow them to carry a player they otherwise couldn’t. Though players usually have to be on the 25-man roster or DL on Aug. 31 to be eligible for the postseason, teams can fill spots left open by players on the DL. Anyone who’s on the 40-man roster as of Aug. 31 can fill those spots, even if they’re not with the team until September (think Andy Dirks, for example).

The Tigers already had two potential spots with Joel Zumaya and Brad Thomas on the DL with season-ending injuries. Boesch makes it three.

Boesch underwent surgery Tuesday in Cleveland to repair a torn ligament in his right thumb. He’s expected to be ready in time for the start of Spring Training, but won’t be ready for the postseason no matter how far the Tigers might advance.

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