June 29th, 2011

Thomas having elbow examined

Brad Thomas is back from his rehab stint for the time being,  but he isn’t back from the disabled list. For that matter, the Tigers aren’t sure if he’s actually healthy after two weeks of pitching at Triple-A Toledo.

After speculation about what the Tigers might do with the left-handed long reliever, they’ve sent him to a team doctor to have his elbow checked out. Thomas was scheduled to make a relief appearance for Triple-A Toledo Tuesday night, but felt some stiffness in his elbow when he warmed up in the bullpen, head athletic trainer Kevin Rand said Wednesday afternoon.

Thomas was supposed to be re-evaluated after that Tuesday outing, according to what Mud Hens manager Phil Nevin told the Toledo Blade last weekend. Instead, he’s set to see team physician Dr. Stephen Lemos to see what, if anything, is going on with the elbow. At this point, Rand indicated they aren’t expecting anything major.

It was elbow inflammation that led him to the disabled list in mid-May.

“It’s precautionary and preventative,” Rand said.

By recalling him from his rehab assignment while he’s being examined, the Tigers stop the countdown towards decision time on whether to activate. Pitchers can stay on a rehab assignment for up to 30 days, and Thomas has been with the Mud Hens for about half that.

Wednesday: Tigers vs. Mets

Miguel Cabrera is 7-for-19 (.368) with two home runs off left-hander Chris Capuano, whose start prompts the usual lefty lineup from Detroit. The lone left-handed hitter in the lineup is Brennan Boesch.

TIGERS

  1. Austin Jackson, CF
  2. Casper Wells, RF
  3. Magglio Ordonez, DH
  4. Miguel Cabrera, 1B
  5. Victor Martinez, C
  6. Jhonny Peralta, SS
  7. Brennan Boesch, LF
  8. Brandon Inge, 3B
  9. Ryan Raburn, 2B

P: Phil Coke

METS

  1. Jose Reyes, SS
  2. Justin Turner, 3B
  3. Carlos Beltran, RF
  4. Ronny Paulino, C
  5. Jason Bay, LF
  6. Angel Pagan, CF
  7. Jerry Scott Hairston, DH
  8. Daniel Murphy, 1B
  9. Ruben Tejada, 2B

P: Chris Capuano

What is going on with Rick Porcello?

Rick Porcello doesn’t have that look at last year when he talks about his struggles. A year ago, he looked exasperated, like his mind was spinning into overdrive trying to figure out why he wasn’t able to get the ground-ball outs that were so plentiful in 2009. Porcello believes he’s on the right track now, and he sounds mature about it.

That’s his look off the field. On the field, he’s taking a beating these last three starts.

To be fair, one of those three games was a debacle of singles at Dodger Stadium last Wednesday, when he looked like a hard-luck pitcher. Another was a Coors Field game for a sinkerball pitcher, and as Mike Hampton might attest, those don’t go well sometimes.

Tuesday was a different feel. If Willie Harris had gotten to second base on his fourth-inning shot off the right field fence, then Porcello would’ve given up the cycle in four batters and just five pitches. Their singles were not cheapies.

It was the kind of outing that, when coupled with the other two, creates concern on a ballclub and a task for a pitching coach.

“Obviously tonight, it was just one of those things,” Rick Knapp said after the game. “He felt like they were on him, and he tried. He used his other pitches. He used his slider. He used his curveball. I thought he threw a couple good curveballs tonight. But at the same time, if he doesn’t execute his best pitch consistently, that’s when he’s going to get hurt.”

The mix of pitches was there for Porcello on Tuesday. The finishing pitch with two strikes was not. Divide Porcello’s 47 strikes thrown by the 11 hits he allowed, and he had just over 4.25 strikes per hit. He also had just two swings and misses from Mets hitters. His 2-to-1 ratio of groundouts to flyouts was good, but that’s because the vast majority of the balls they hit in the air against him went for hits.

“Tonight he threw some bad pitches that they hit, and he threw some decent pitches that they hit,” Jim Leyland said. “It just wasn’t his night.”

When you hear about hitters doing damage on good pitches, and hitters barely missing any pitches, one of the first things to come to mind is whether a pitcher is tipping his pitches. It’s something pitchers and coaches don’t like to talk about much, and they weren’t saying a whole lot after the game Tuesday. But it’s safe to say they’re looking at it, looking for anything that might even give a hint.

When those numbers are coming against a pitcher like Porcello, who focuses on one very good pitch that can get outs even when hitters know it’s coming, then it can be a different question. Is he throwing his secondary pitches well enough to keep hitters honest? Is he executing the bread-and-butter pitch?

Statistically, Porcello had one of his better mixes going, with double-digit pitch totals in four different pitches. But his slider, which often complements his sinker, just wasn’t working, getting just seven strikes out of 15 pitches, and his changeup was marginally better.

Look at his strike zone plot on brooksbaseball.net, too, and though he had some pitches low, almost all of them were first-pitch balls, which led to second-pitch strikes higher up in the zone. The two swing-and-miss strikes he got were both on high pitches.

“I think it’s just a matter of pitch making,” Porcello said. “I think early on [this season, when he was on], I was down in the zone very consistently and lately, balls have been coming up. I’ve been paying the price for it. It just can’t go any further. I’ve got to squash it and make sure that everything I’m throwing is down in the zone and keeping guys off-balance with a good mix of pitches.

“I definitely felt like today and in previous bad outings, I think guys have been all over my fastball, especially left-handed hitters. That’s been kind of na ongoing thing for me that I’ve got to make sure I shut down lefties in the lineup. Almost all the lineups I’m going to face are stacked with left-handed hitters. That’s just an ongoing challenge.”

I asked Porcello what he saw as the difference, pitch-wise, between what he threw in Pittsburgh in May over eight scoreless innings and what he threw Tuesday night.

“I think there’s not a big difference between my stuff in Pittsburgh and now,” he said. “In fact, I think velocity-wise, it was the best my fastball has been all year. I felt like I had a pretty sharp slider again. It’s just a matter of throwing strikes and putting the pressure on them to (with) pitches.”

It might well have been that the Pirates simply didn’t hit him well, or that the Mets hit him particularly well. But unlike last year, he calls this a bump in the road.

I know the question will come up among fans whether Porcello needs to go to Toledo to work things out. At this point, I would say no. It wasn’t that long ago that he was pitching effectively, and it’s abundantly clear that the Tigers need to get him going here to have any shot at doing things in October. I don’t see any other clear candidate as a third starter right now. I don’t think Jacob Turner is ready for that yet, and I think Andy Oliver has his own set of circumstances. You have to be able to throw someone other than Justin Verlander and Max Scherzer at a team, and when Porcello is right, he’s by far the best of the rest.

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