Bautista designated

For those of you who wondered which reliever would go when Zumaya was activated today, it’s Denny Bautista. He was designated for assignment today, meaning the Tigers have 10 days to try to trade or outright him to the minor leagues.

14 Comments

I thought Bautista had promise. Do we have Rapada round still? 3 lefties in the pen?

You just know JL will throw Joel in a game sooner rather than later. I hope he doesn’t throw his arm out in front of his friends and family.
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Good luck Joel and I hope yu can harness the talent you have and make yourself a great career.

Rapada has been in Toledo for a few days.
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I found it interesting that they could have optioned Dolsi, but decided to designate Bautista. That’s a vote of confidence for Freddy. Also the correct move, IMO. Dolsi doesn’t seem to have control problems.
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–Rich

1at and foremost, Glad Zoom is back, and hope JL doesn’t mess him up like Rodney.
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The club didn’t option Dolsi, that shows that they are trying to win. Optioning him would have meant more experiments in the Bullpen.
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As i said previously, I think it should have been either Seay or Fossum. Denny pitched better lately, so i don’t get it. Until Rodney and Zumaya regain their form, we have 4 shaky pitchers in the pen. Since TJ is the closer and Miner might be long relief, that leaves Dolsi.
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That in my opinion is scary. I think Denny, Lopez and Rapada should be with the club instead of Bonine, Fossum and Seay. At least a couple of the 3.
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JL facination with LH pitchers and LH batters will cost him big one day .. bigger than the Jaques Jones fiasco.

And i don’t understand the reason for swapping Clevlen and Thomas. Just cuz he bats left and JL has a soft spot for him?

Hey Dan, I agree with you’re statement to stay with Jones as long as he can consistently close. That is fair enough. I would hope that he can be successful through the entire season. Zumaya and maybe even Dolsi have shots at being the future closer but you would hope for Jones’ and the team’s sake that it would happen during the off season. Todd is 10 for 10 which obviously shows he hasn’t had many opportunities-I guess about 10? If my memory serves me, most of those were probably multi run saves. He will inevitably be tested in the near future in some one run leads. Generally he has looked good, a couple or three times he came close to blowing it. He hasn’t completely imploded yet and maybe that won’t happen. But the law of averages says it probably will. But he still should ultimately be graded on his saves, not on the numerous anxiety producing close calls. The job is his to lose. Meanwhile Zumaya and Dolsi will be waiting in the wings and pitching in their own stressful circumstances.

Todd Jones has come into one game this year with a one run lead. In Arizona, he entered for the save in a 3-2 game. I remember wondering what would happen with this one, and sure enough, 1-2-3 inning. He’s certainly interesting, to say the least. “Entertaining” might be too strong a word. :-)
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I’d think Leyland could and would go with one lefty in the pen, but he probably doesn’t have a world of confidence in either one of them at this point. Where have you gone, Jamie Walker? Are the Yankees still without a lefty in their pen? I know they were for awhile.
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I hope Bonine settles in tonight, because we’re going to need something out of the fifth starter. Hey, isn’t it funny that it’s Todd Jones who should be named Bonine?
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–Rich

this is from Curtis Granderson’s ESPN blog; regarding the SF Giants press and Ryan Raburn:
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Accentuate the positive
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Note: This blog is also published on ESPN.com. This blog may not be re-published without the expressed written consent of Full Athlete Marketing.
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It’s interesting to me when writers, announcers and commentators make negative comments about a player. When I say negative comments, I’m not just talking about a person making an error, or a bad pitch/play/swing, but actually criticizing a player’s personality or ability when they have never met or consistently seen a player perform in person.
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If a player makes a good play or is playing well, why not talk about what that person has done well? Why put the focus on what the player isn’t doing or can’t do? In our Tuesday night game against the Giants, Ryan Raburn and Marcus Thames both homered in the game. Raburn’s home run came during a pinch-hit at-bat to give us a 2-1 lead, and Thames’ came later in the game to extend the lead and make it five consecutive games with a home run for him.
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The next day in a San Francisco newspaper in the front page of the sports section, there was a story about the game. When it came to the part about Raburn, the story says he is a “scrub” who came off the bench to hit a home run. It also mentions that Thames was an all-or-nothing guy.
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I don’t see how you can say that a major league utility player like Raburn who just hit a go-ahead home run off the bench is a scrub, or how a player like Thames, who has played left field, right field, first base, and DH, is an all-or-nothing player. When other guys are hitting home runs and have a lower batting average than Thames, they are called power hitters. Raburn doesn’t play everyday, and that’s how he should have been referred to, not as a scrub.
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It may seem as if I’m being biased toward my team, but recently I have seen this happening with players around the league. When watching ESPNews the other day, Michael Borne, an outfielder for the Astros, made a great play to rob the Orioles’ Nick Markakis of a home run. And instead of just commenting about the great catch, they also mention that Borne can’t hit a lick. Again, the highlight was a great defensive play; why not just talk about the great play?
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In all three of these cases, the players made great plays or had big hits, and instead of just complimenting their performance, people found a way to spin it into a negative. The media plays an important role, not just in sports, but in society. Giving your opinion is one thing. Name-calling is another, and editors shouldn’t so easily allow it in their publications. Calling a professional athlete a “scrub” would be one of those cases.
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glad to hear outrage from the tiger’s clubhouse, as well as from us faithful fans.
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mike

I was wondering when the Clevlen/Thomas swap would be questioned. It’s kind of a darned if you do, darned if you don’t type of thing. I think, with the current team configuration, they can get more mileage out of Thomas. LH bat, speed, drop down a bunt and such. This is a fluid situation, though. I do think that Brent Clevlen will be a starting outfielder for Detroit in the future. Possibly the near future.
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–Rich

More from Granderson, talking about rooting:
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I am, however, a Kansas fan, and there have been years when they didn’t play so well or lost early in the NCAA Tournament, but I’m not as diehard a fan as most Tigers fans are, and it’s not the end of the world to me if Kansas loses a big game like it seems to be for Tiger fans. I’ll never boo or say guys on Kansas or any other team suck because they aren’t playing good. There has to be a winner and a loser in every game, and sometimes Kansas will lose just like we, the Tigers, lose — and I understand that.

And a pretty hilarious observation on Jim Leyland and clubhouse rants:
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We lost a game, and the way we were mentally unprepared caused Leyland to snap on us. We had a bunch of different gadgets and drills that are supposed to help you with hitting. Considering we didn’t hit that well that game, Leyland snapped at us about those different things. He yelled at us about how we couldn’t have been prepared with all this equipment that we have, and the fact that we had so much stuff to work with it was like we had “ping-pong balls flying out our —.” At the time, of course, no one on the team could say anything, but after we finally realized what he said, we laughed and said, “Did he really say that?”

Everybody should read Grandy’s blog, and also Todd Jones over at sportingnews.com. Todd’s are insightful and sometimes brutally honest. There are some bad blogs out there, but a good player blog can really help get “on the inside” of things.
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–Rich

That’s hilarious Rich. Ping Pong balls, he didn’t mean King Kong’s balls did he?
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That’s a strory that made you feel you were there to witness it first hand. I can just see it.
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We make a bit of fun of our boy J and it seems the team does too!
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Where did you acquire that anecdote Rich? I’m still laughin’.

That is funny! Often times it’s the wording that makes something funny, not that it makes any sense. Was JL describing some sort of pitching machine?

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